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Bicycle Rodeos - How to run an event.

Just like bicycle education is more than a shove down the driveway, a bicycle rodeo is more than just an obstacle course. This "Guide to Bicycle Rodeos" is intended to give you the tools to run a successful event that provides a strong educational component for the participants. All the information contained here may be reproduced.

When we remember back to our first bicycle, we remember that it provided fun, freedom, independence, transportation and responsibility. The bicycle is the most efficient machine known to mankind. The bicycle is playing a role in many of the issues facing us today, heath & wellness, environmental concerns and transportation. As more and more Americans rediscover the bicycle, it is critical that all users understand how to safely drive a bicycle.

Why run a bicycle rodeo, Well it first and foremost teaches bicycle safety if run properly. With time constraints it is an efficient, effective and concise way of presenting bicycle safety. The practical aspect of the training is a powerful tool. But most importantly, children have fun while learning.

Simply stated, it is education by practice. It is a bicycle skills event which provides an opportunity for bicyclists to practice and develop skills that will help them to become better bicyclists and avoid typical crashes.

SKILLED INSTRUCTORS

An effective bicycle safety education program must have skilled instructors. Children can often time see right through those who don't know what they are talking about. The challenge then is where to find adults with bicycle safety knowledge?

Some ideas:

DESIGN

An effective bicycle safety education program is designed to address the behaviors that most often result in crashes.

These behaviors include:


We must understand that a vast majority of accidents (50% or more) do not involve cars or others, but the child simply loses control of the bike and crashes to the ground.

SKILLS TO TEACH

 

 

 


 

 

ORGANIZING A BICYCLE RODEO








PLANNING COMMITTEE

A well balanced committee is an extremely beneficial asset. It should be made up of representatives of the school/organization sponsoring the event, local community resources and parents. This needs to be a working committee, so be very clear when recruiting members of the committee.

BUDGET

After reviewing this section you will need to identify those things that you will need to pay for. Then obviously you need to identify a way to pay for them.

VOLUNTEERS
LOCATION

Where will you hold the event?

• School
• Park
• Other

PUBLICITY

Determine types

• PSAs
• Newspaper ads
• Newsletters
• Handouts
• Emails
• Web Page
• Banners
• Signs
• Other

REGISTRATION
HELMETS
AWARDS, PRIZES, REFRESHMENTS

PLANNING AND DESIGNING THE COURSE
SUPPLIES NEEDED
MEETINGS
EXHIBTORS AND BOOTHS

Your Planning Committee needs to decide if it is going to have exhibitors at your event. Some possibilities include:

 

 


 

SAMPLE FLOW CHART FOR A BICYCLE RODEO

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One inherent problem with Bicycle Rodeos is that their very nature leads to a bottle neck of participants in the beginning. Rodeos are managed easiest when the participants are segregated in to groups.

The general flow should go from one registration area to multiple bike inspection points. From the bike inspection they should flow into their assigned groups. During this "holding" phase in their groups it is a good time to talk about helmet fit, bike fit, hand signals and rules of the road.

Groups may do any of the 3 stations in any order. The Rodeo leader should signal when the groups are to move. The Slow Race should always be the last event and all riders can participate at the same time (although still against other group members). This increases the excitement and fun of this culminating event.

 

 


 

 

BIKE INSPECTIION STATION

 

Time does not allow for repairs to children's bicycles. Air in the tires and simple bolt tightening is about all that time will allow for. It is important that a check list be completed and given to the parent for follow up.

Although best done by someone with bicycle repair knowledge, the inspections in a pinch can be done by anyone with a little mechanical knowledge. Below are the important areas to check.

1. WHEELS - Are they straight? Do they wobble?
2. SPOKES - Are any bent or broken? Are any loose?
3. TIRES - Do they feel firm? Are they wearing out? Is the tread clean?
4. PEDALS - Are they wearing out?
5. CHAIN WHEEL (OR SPROCKET) - Is it bent or damaged?
6. CHAIN - Is it snug? Are there any broken or damaged links?
7. BRAKES (COASTER OR HAND) - Do they stop bike fast and smoothly?
8. FRAME, FENDER, FORK - Are they straight? Do they rub any other part of the bike? Are
the nuts and bolts tight?
9. CHAIN GUARD - Is it bent?
10. SEAT (OR SADDLE) - Is it tight? Is it level with the ground?
11. HANDLEBARS - Are they tight? Are the handgrips tight?
12. BIKE FIT - Is the seat height comfortable for the person? Is the handlebar height comfortable
for the person?

Tools Needed  (one set for each inspector)

You can download a sample Bike Inspection checklist .alt

 

 

 


 

 

BIKE FIT STATION

 

BikeFit

 

 

For more detailed information on bicycle fit review the Bike Fit article.

 

 


 

 

HELMET FIT STATION

helmet5

Everyone should wear bicycle helmets each time they ride. Helmets are the single most effective way to prevent head injuries resulting from bicycle crashes. The helmet must fit the person's head now, not a helmet to "grow into." For more information on how to properly fit a helmet review the How to Fit a Helmet article.

 

 


 

 

TURN SIGNALS STATION

Picture6

Children need to be encouraged to use turn signals (it is the law).
Simply they need to get used to point in the direction they are going.

 

 


 

RULES OF THE ROAD STATION


This is a good opportunity to review the basic rules of the road with the children.

 

 


 

 

 

THE COURSE - General Procedures

 

 

Picture7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

START & STOP // SCANNING
// ROCK DODGE STATION

 

STARTS AND STOPS

Picture8OBJECTIVE

To teach bicyclists how to start and stop their bicycles safely and efficiently

PROCEDURE

Starts:
Demonstrate how to get started; allow space for everyone to try it.
Stops:
Discourage stops that are executed by dragging feet.

 

Picture9SCANNING:

OBJECTIVE

Teach bicyclist to look behind for traffic without swerving or falling.

 

PROCEDURE
  • Send participant through the course first. Ask them to concentrate on staying in a straight line and to avoid the obstacle at the top of the course.
  • On the second run through the course, tell them you are going to call their name (or say "look") and they are to look over their left shoulder and tell you what number you are holding up. IMPORTANT THAT IT IS LEFT SHOULDER BECAUSE BICYCLISTS MUST RIDE ON RIGHT SIDE OF STREET AND NEED TO LOOK OVER LEFT SHOULDER TO SEE CARS.
  • On the third run (if they've demonstrated proficiency), ask them to scan, and then signal.
  • On the fourth run reverse directions and have them signal the other way.
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    ROCK DODGE

    OBJECTIVE

    Teach bicyclists control and balance, and how to avoid hazards while riding.


    PROCEDURE

    Lay sponges out at the top of the course. Vary configuration of sponges on each run.

    EQUIPMENT

     

     

     

     

     


     

     

    DEMON DRIVEWAY // CRAZY CROSSROADS











    Picture10DEMON DRIVEWAY

    OBJECTIVE

    Teach children to stop at the end of their driveway and look both ways to determine if it is safe before turning onto the street.

     

    CRAZY CROSSROADS

    OBJECTIVE

    Teach bicyclists to stop at stop signs; wait for traffic; look in both directions; position pedal for a takeoff; and go when there is no conflicting traffic.




    PROCEDURE

     

  • First time, children should ride out to edge of street. Stop and look left, look right and look left again for traffic. Then make a right turn and continue to corner with stop sign. Again stop and look for traffic and then go straight through the intersection.
  • Second time through volunteers should hold up cars so that children will have to identify cars and wait for them to pass before continuing on.
  • When children finish the course have them circle around to end of line heading out the driveway.
  • Ask children what obstacles may be at the end of their driveway that they need to look around.
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    EQUIPMENT

    Cut out cars (2)
    Stop sign

    You can download templates to make your own car alt and stop sign alt.

     

     

     


     

     

     

    FIGURE 8



    Picture11

     

    OBJECTIVE

    The objective is to develop the rider's ability to maintain balance in both a clockwise and counter-clockwise direction as well as controlling the bicycle, slowing and interacting safely with others on the course.



    PROCEDURE

     

    EQUIPMENT

    None

     

     


     




    SLOW RACE (always the last event)




    Picture12

    OBJECTIVE

    The objective is to teach balance and control of the bicycle, plus a little fun.

     

    PROCEDURE


    EQUIPMENT

    Cones to mark lanes

     





    DOWNLOADS
    Picture7

     

     

    Bike Rodeo Layout alt

    Checklist

     

    Bike Inspection Checklist  alt

    StopSignTemplate


    Stop Sign Template alt

    CarTemplate

    Car Template  alt
    Certificate

    Certificate of Achievement